Software

Microsoft Outlook Shortcut Keys

Microsoft Outlook

Image Credit: Microsoft Corporation

We may have written a few articles about common shortcut keys for various software, but it seems we missed Outlook. Since it is one of the more commonly used software for business email, we thought we’d take the time to share some keyboard shortcuts that will help you get around quicker, and get more out of Outlook.

Here are a few of our favorite shortcuts.

Note: * Denotes commonly used shortcuts for PC software.

  • Arrow Keys: Move throughout the navigation pane.
  • Left / Right Arrow Keys: Collapse / expand a group in the e-mail message list.
  • ALT + . (period): Opens the Address Book with the To: field selected.
  • ALT + B: Opens the Address Book with the BCC: field selected.
  • ALT + C: Select message recipients for CC: field.
  • ALT + D: Switch to Daily Calendar view.
  • ALT + E: Open the Edit drop down menu.
  • ALT + F: Open the File drop down menu.
  • ALT + K: Check names in the To:, CC:, or BCC: field against the Address Book. Note: Cursor must be in the corresponding field to check contacts.
  • ALT + L: Reply All, in an open message.
  • ALT + M: Switch to Monthly Calendar view.
  • ALT + R: Reply / Switch to Work Week Calendar view.
  • ALT + S: Sends an open message.
  • ALT + Y: Switch to Daily Calendar view.
  • ALT + F4: Close the active window.
  • CTRL + 1: Switch to Mail.
  • CTRL + 2: Switch to Calendar.
  • CTRL + 3: Switch to Contacts.
  • CTRL + 4: Switch to Tasks.
  • CTRL + 5: Switch to Notes
  • CTLR + 6: Switch to Folder list in Navigation Pane.
  • CTLR + 7: Switch to Shortcuts.
  • CTRL +A: Select all. *
  • CTRL + B: Bold selected text. *
  • CTRL + C: Copy selected text. *
  • CTRL + D: Delete an item (message, task, contact, etc.)
  • CTRL + F: Forward an item, must have a message open.
  • CTRL + J: Open a new Journal Entry for the selected item (message, task, contact, etc.)
  • CTRL + M: Send / Receive All.
  • CTRL + O: Open selected item. *
  • CTRL + P: Print selected item. Opens Print dialogue box. *
  • CTRL + Q: Mark the selected message as Read.
  • CTRL + R: Reply to selected / open message.
  • CTRL + T: Tab.
  • CTRL + U: Mark selected message as unread.
  • CTRL + V: Paste cut / copied information. *
  • CTRL + X: Cut selected information. *
  • CTRL + Y: Go to folder.
  • CTRL + , (comma): Switch to the next item. Note: must have an item open to use this command.
  • CTRL + . (period): Switch to previous item. Note: must have an item open to use this command.
  • CTRL + Shift + Tab (or F6): Switch between the Folder List and the main Outlook window.
  • CTRL + Shift + A: Open a new Appointment.
  • CTRL + Shift + B: Opens the Address Book.
  • CTRL + Shift + C: Create a new contact.
  • CTRL + Shift + E: Open a new folder.
  • CTRL + Shift + G: Flag selected message for follow up.
  • CTRL + Shift + J: Open a new Journal Entry.
  • CTRL + Shift + K: Open a new Task.
  • CTRL + Shift + L: Open a new Distribution List.
  • CTRL + Shift + M: Open a new Message.
  • CTRL + Shift + N: Open a new Note.
  • CTRL + Shift + O: Switch to the Outbox.
  • CTRL + Shift + P: Open the New Search Folder window.
  • CTRL + Shift + Q: Open a new Meeting Request.
  • CTRL + Shift + S: Open a new Discussion.
  • CTRL + Shift + U: Open a new Task Request.
  • CTRL + Shift + Y: Copy a folder.
  • Tab: Move throughout the navigation pane and reading pane in Outlook.
  • + or -: Expand or collapse a folder or selected group in the Navigation Pane.
  • F7: Spellcheck
  • F9: Send / Receive all.
  • F12: Save As.

If you want to learn shortcut keys for other software, checkout our other shortcut posts:


Julie Strier is a freelance writer who wants to help you use your technology smarter and faster. Email: julie@mybusinesswriter.com. Website: www.mybusinesswriter.com.

 

Microsoft Word Shortcut Keys

Microsoft Word

Image Credit: By RRZEicons

Through observation we’ve come to learn that there really are only two types of computer users – those who rely heavily on keyboard commands, and those who rely on the mouse.

While neither input type is incorrect, as both will probably yield the same results in the end, learning to rely on the keyboard for as much input as possible tends to make the actually process of using the computer faster. That’s because you’re not interrupting typing flow to grab the mouse, instead, just enter the shortcut key for the command, and the software does the rest.

Which is why we love shortcut keys, because they enable us to do our jobs more efficiently, will little extra effort.

Here are a few of our favorite Microsoft Word Shortcut Keys. Learn these, and you might not have to fumble around the Ribbon looking for things anymore. (The Ribbon is the menu bar across the top in Office 2007 – 2013.)

Note: * denotes a common shortcut used in most PC software.

  • ALT + F4: Exits Microsoft Word.
  • CTRL + A: Select all. *
  • CTRL + B: Bolds selected text. *
  • CTRL + C: Copies the selection to the clipboard. *
  • CTRL + E: Centers selected paragraph.
  • CTRL + F: Find – searched the active document for the specified information. *
  • CTRL + I: Italicizes selected text. *
  • CTRL + J: Justifies selected text.
  • CTRL + L: Left aligns selected text.
  • CTRL + M: Indent selected paragraph from the left.
  • CTRL + N: Opens a new document. *
  • CTRL + O: Opens a previously saved document. *
  • CTRL + P: Prints the active file, print options will appear first to confirm before printing. *
  • CTRL + R: Right align paragraph for selected text.
  • CTRL + S: Saves the document. *
  • CTRL + T: Create an hanging indent for selected text.
  • CTRL + U: Underlines selected text. *
  • CTRL + V: Paste – inserts the copied / cut content into the desired location. *
  • CTRL + W: Closes the active window, but leaves Word open.
  • CTRL + X: Cut – removes the selection from the document and places it on the clipboard. *
  • CTRL + Y: Redo the previous action. *
  • CTRL + Z: Undo the last action. *
  • CTRL + 1: Single space lines for selected text.
  • CTRL + 2: Double space lines for selected text.
  • CTRL + 5: Set line spacing to 1.5 for selected text.
  • CTRL + Backspace: Delete one entire word/character to the left.
  • CTRL + Delete: Deletes one entire word/character to the right.
  • CTRL + End: Moves the cursor to the end of the document.
  • CTRL + Home: Moves the cursor to the beginning of the document.
  • CTRL + Shift ++: Apply Superscript formatting to selected text.
  • CTRL + =: Apply Subscript formatting to selected text.
  • CTRL + Shift + C: Copy formats.
  • CTRL + Shift + D: Double underline text.
  • CTRL + Shift + T: Reduce a hanging indent for selected text.
  • CTRL + Shift + V: Past Formats
  • CTRL + Shift + W: Underlines words, but not spaces.
  • CTRL + Shift+>: Increases font size of selected text.
  • CTRL + Shift+<: Decreases font size of selected text.
  • CTRL+]: Increases selected text one point.
  • CTRL+[: Decreases selected text one point.
  • Shift+F3: Changes the case of the selected text.
  • Shift + Left Arrow Key: If text is already selected, will extend selection one character to the left.
  • Shift + Right Arrow Key: If text is already selected, will extend selection one character to the right.
  • CTRL + Shift + Left Arrow Key: If text is already selected, will extend selection to the beginning of a word.
  • CTRL + Shift + Right Arrow Key: If text is already selected, will extend selection to the end of a word.

If you want to learn shortcut keys for other software, checkout our other shortcut posts:


Julie Strier is a freelance writer who wants to help you use your technology smarter and faster. Email: julie@mybusinesswriter.com. Website: www.mybusinesswriter.com.

Google Reader Says Goodbye, Leaves Users Looking for Alternatives

Google Reader

Image Credit: benstein

If you follow more than a few blogs, you probably use an RSS reader to manage your subscriptions. (And if you don’t, you probably should. Keep reading to find out why.)

But what happens when your favorite reader service suddenly announces plans to close?

This is exactly the situation Google Reader users find themselves in, as Google announced that they would be shutting down the service for good as of July 1, 2013.

Now, users of the service are scratching their heads, wondering where they’ll end up this summer.

What is an RSS Reader?

Rich Site Summary, or RSS, also known as Really Simple Syndication, is a way to publish frequently updated web works, such as blog posts, headlines, audio, and video, in a standardized format. RSS Readers allow website owners, or publishers, to easily syndicate their content easily.

Additionally, RSS allows readers to organize and collect constantly changing content in a feed that they can review and read at their leisure, without having to visit the actual website it was published on.

Why is Google Stopping the Google Reader Service?

Since 2011, Google has been actively involved in spring cleaning, that is, cleaning up products and services that no longer serve the company or its users. As part of this cleanup, services were reviewed to determine popularity and usage.

Google Reader didn’t make the cut, mostly because service usage has declined over the years, and Google feels that their focus can better be served elsewhere.

Exporting Your Google Reader Data

If you are a Google Reader user, you don’t have to worry about manually moving all your data. Instead, use the Google Takeout service to export your information and move it to a new RSS service. Please note, you only have until July 1, 2013 to export your Reader data.

Just login to your Google Account on the Takeout page, wait until it loads your reader services, and click Create Archive. You can then import your archive using any RSS service that allows you to import OPML files.

What Next?

Once your data is exported, you will need to find another reader to use. You can either sign up with a free reader service online, locate a browser based plug-in, or download an app for your mobile device. Then, import your OPML file, and you’re back to following your favorite blogs, just like before.   

Want to see what other services Google is cutting? Read the full list on their blog.


Julie Strier is a freelance writer who likes to help stay on top of the changes to your favorite services. Email:julie@mybusinesswriter.com. Website: www.mybusinesswriter.com.