Employees

Microsoft to End Support on XP, Office 2003 & 2008 in 2014

Image Credit: Microsoft Corporation

Image Credit: Microsoft Corporation

When purchasing software, do you ever think about the end-of-life cycle for that particular program? If you’re like everyone else, you probably don’t.

The thing is, all software has a cycle – a period of time when the company will support that particular version of the software.

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So what you purchase today won’t always be supported.

Typically software is no longer supported when there are several newer versions out, or when the software is so outdated that it no longer functions properly on newer computers, whichever comes first.

In early April, 2013, Microsoft announced its plans to phase out support for a few of their older software, a change that could leave businesses (and individuals) in the lurch.

Microsoft’s determination for phasing out software is fairly clear cut – they promise to support their products for a minimum of 10 years, with 5 years of mainstream support, and 5 years of extended support.

And next year, on April 8, 2014, Microsoft is phasing out support on a few (still) popular products:

  • Windows XP
  • Office 2003
  • Office 2008 – Mac Version – support ends April 9, 2014

So what does this change mean for businesses? Well, nothing and everything.

Of course you can continue to use your outdated products, as technically they will still work just like they did before. However, problems requiring support through Microsoft won’t be fixable, and over time you could see even bigger issues.

The larger reality is that if you’re still using these older operating systems and office products, you could probably stand for an update. Newer operating systems, though they require a small learning curve, run faster and help you produce more than their older counterparts. Additionally, newer software boasts better features, and increased security through patches, bug fixes, and software updates.

Though it would require a bit of an initial investment, upgrading your office, particularly if you are still using any of these programs, will end up saving you in the long run in time and money made back due to increased productivity.

If your business is still using these outdated software products, give us a call today. We can help you evaluate which newer versions are right for your business, and help get them implemented and installed so that you aren’t affected by this change.


Julie Strier is a freelance writer who likes to help you navigate through changes in your software. Email: julie@mybusinesswriter.com. Website: www.mybusinesswriter.com.

How to Quickly Unsubscribe from Emails

Email

Image Credit: Sean MacEntee

If you’ve had your email address for any length of time, you’ve probably used it to sign up for all sorts of services – newsletters, coupons, store savings cards, and more. And while it’s helpful to receive information like this in our email, it creates its own sets of problems – like a cluttered inbox.

As time goes one, there will eventually come a time where you’ll want to unsubscribe from everything, or simply create a new email address to avoid dealing with all this extra email.

However, the problem with manually unsubscribing is that it is time consuming, often requiring multiple clicks and accessing different webpages, to take yourself off a mailing list. And creating a new email address isn’t much better, because of the time it takes to educate your important contacts on the change.

So what do you do when you need to mass unsubscribe from emails? Depending on your email address, you have a few options.

Use a Service

Unwanted email from mailing lists is now such a large problem that services are being created to help you easily and quickly manage everything. Generally, all you have to do is sign up with a service, follow a few prompts, and they’ll manage the rest.

Currently these types of services are only available for web-based email accounts such as Gmail, Yahoo! Mail, AOL, etc. Check the particulars of each service to determine which service interfaces with which email.

Services that handle unsubscribing include:

Swizzle

Unlistr – for iPhone / iPad only

UnsubscribeDeals

Unroll.me

Use Your Email Program’s Filtering Options

Many email programs will allow you to filter your inbox just by searching. To quickly and easily sort your mass mailings and newsletters, try searching for the term “unsubscribe” to pull up a list of all emails with an unsubscribe link.

Of course, you will still have to manually unsubscribe from each mailing list, still making the task a little time consuming.

These are just a few ways you can easily unsubscribe from mass emails. Do you have a favorite way to easily unsubscribe from services? Leave us a comment to let us know your tricks.


Julie Strier is a freelance writer who wants to help make your email easier to find. Email: julie@mybusinesswriter.com. Website: www.mybusinesswriter.com.

PowerPoint Keyboard Shortcuts

PowerPoint Kareoke

Image Credit: Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

Do you make a lot of presentations in PowerPoint? Then this post is for you. Here’s a bunch of our favorite keyboard shortcuts, guaranteed to help you navigate the program more easily.

* Denotes a common program command

CTRL + B: Bold*

CTRL +C: Copy*

CTRL + I: Italic*

CTRL + E: Center Paragraph

CTRL + J: Justified Paragraph

CTRL + K: Create Hyperlink

CTRL + L: Let-Aligned Paragraph

CTRL + R: Right-Aligned Paragraph

CTRL + U: Underline*

CTRL + V: Paste*

CTRL + X: Cut*

CTRL + Z: Undo*

CTRL + Drag (the mouse): Create a copy of the selected text.

CTRL + Shift + F, then use up / down arrows to select font, press Enter when done – Change Font Size

CTRL + Shift + P: Change Point Size

CTRL + Shift + Z: Plain Text

CTRL + Shift + >: Increase Font Size

CTRL + Shift +<: Decrease Font Size

Shift + F3: Toggles selection through lower case, upper case, and initial caps

F5: Start a presentation from the beginning

F7: Spellchecker

<Number> + Enter: Go to slide <number>

PowerPoint Shortcuts to Use During Presentations

F5: Start presentation from the beginning

A or Equals Sign (=): Show / hide arrow pointer

B or Period (.): Display blank black slide / return to the presentation from a blank black slide

E: Erase on-screen annotations

H: Go to the next hidden slide.

M: Use mouse-click to advance while rehearsing

N, Enter, Page Down, Right Arrow, Down Arrow, or Spacebar (choose one): Advance to next slide / perform next animation

O: Use original timings while rehearsing

P, Page Up, Left Arrow, Up Arrow, or Backspace (choose one): Return to previous slide / perform previous animation

R: Re-record slide narration and timing

S: Stop / start automatic presentation

T: Set new timings while rehearsing

W or Comma (,): Display blank white slide / return to the presentation from a blank white slide

<Number> + Enter: Go to slide <number>

ATL + Q: Stop media playback

ALT + P: Play / pause

ALT + U: Mute

ALT + Down: Decrease volume

ALT + END: Next bookmark

ALT + HOME: Previous bookmark

ALT + Up: Increase volume

ALT + SHIFT + Page Down: Seek forward

ALT + Shift + Page Up: Seek backward

CTRL + A: Change pointer to an arrow

CTRL+E: Change pointer to an eraser

CTRL + H: Hide pointer and navigation button immediately

CTRL + M: Show / hide ink markup

CTRL + S: View the All Slides dialogue box

CTRL + T: View computer task bar

CTRL + U: Hide pointer and navigation button in 15 seconds

SHIFT + F10: Display shortcut menu

SHIFT + TAB: Go to last / previous hyperlink on slide

TAB: Go to first / next hyperlink on slide

We have posted similar articles about Excel, Outlook, and Word. Did you miss one? Follow the links below.

 


Julie Strier is a freelance writer who wants to help you use your software more efficiently. Email: julie@mybusinesswriter.com. Website: www.mybusinesswriter.com.