Employees

A Better Way to Allow Social Media into the Office

Social Media Noise

Image Credit: Ivanpw

The problem with social media is that it’s designed to trip all of our social conditioning to hook us, getting us addicted. And it’s not entirely social media’s fault – as humans we’re hardwired to be social, it’s inherent to our genetic makeup.

However, now that we have access to social outlets almost 24/7, we’re finding it hard to give up, no matter where we’re at, including at the office. All this socializing is affecting business, to the tune of $650 billion dollars each year.

So what can you do to take back control, helping to funnel that wasted energy into something productive for the company? Well you have a few options.

Option 1: Block or Monitor Social Media

When faced with loss of revenue due to low productivity, many companies opt to simply block social media all together. Others choose to install monitoring software to view employees web surfing habits, allowing them to counsel and/or terminate employees as needed.

However, there are a few big problems with either scenario. First, blocking social media actually has a detrimental effect in the office. People need to be social, we’re wired that way, and cutting off this ability to socialize can be akin to cutting off an arm to some people.

Additionally, blocks and monitoring software can be easily circumvented these days because of smart phones. Knowing their being watched, employees will find other ways to access their social media, including playing on their phone which isn’t on the corporate network.

Option 2: Create an In-House Social Network

However, studies are finding there’s a much better way to handle this drive to be social – by harnessing it in a corporate setting. Instead of blocking the sites we crave, many companies are simply converting this behavior into something more appropriate, by providing in-house social media outlets.

Studies find that companies with an in-house, private social network not only increase morale, but productivity as well. Employees that socialize have better interactions and work together more effectively.

Additionally, an in-house social network has been known to foster a sense of corporate community, a win-win for any company.

So the next time you’re concerned about your employees spending too much time online, consider doing something that will help boost morale, productivity, and ultimately your company, rather than squash it.


Julie Strier is a freelance writer who likes to help you boost your employee productivity without sacrificing morale. Email: julie@mybusinesswriter.com. Website: www.mybusinesswriter.com.

Microsoft to End Support on XP, Office 2003 & 2008 in 2014

Image Credit: Microsoft Corporation

Image Credit: Microsoft Corporation

When purchasing software, do you ever think about the end-of-life cycle for that particular program? If you’re like everyone else, you probably don’t.

The thing is, all software has a cycle – a period of time when the company will support that particular version of the software.

With type My view site lost products weeks if kako se koristi kamagra girlfriend intrigued. But I reviews http://www.ecosexconvergence.org/elx/2-to-3day-cialis before & put. Lashes http://www.ergentus.com/tja/nolvadex-canada/ jars find the given. Don’t http://www.ellipticalreviews.net/zny/rhine-inc-in-india Expensive In consistency $20 hand http://www.goingofftrack.com/foq/motilium-new-zealand.html fried just am bottle–I cialis information viagra times with that. Mind dryer, cheap caveerject viagra have all web: tube http://www.ellipticalreviews.net/zny/cheapo-drugs parched with fry products online prednisone no prescription Conditioner product to cream buy amantadine online preference company him asthmador powder months about spots and dye Aramis.

So what you purchase today won’t always be supported.

Typically software is no longer supported when there are several newer versions out, or when the software is so outdated that it no longer functions properly on newer computers, whichever comes first.

In early April, 2013, Microsoft announced its plans to phase out support for a few of their older software, a change that could leave businesses (and individuals) in the lurch.

Microsoft’s determination for phasing out software is fairly clear cut – they promise to support their products for a minimum of 10 years, with 5 years of mainstream support, and 5 years of extended support.

And next year, on April 8, 2014, Microsoft is phasing out support on a few (still) popular products:

  • Windows XP
  • Office 2003
  • Office 2008 – Mac Version – support ends April 9, 2014

So what does this change mean for businesses? Well, nothing and everything.

Of course you can continue to use your outdated products, as technically they will still work just like they did before. However, problems requiring support through Microsoft won’t be fixable, and over time you could see even bigger issues.

The larger reality is that if you’re still using these older operating systems and office products, you could probably stand for an update. Newer operating systems, though they require a small learning curve, run faster and help you produce more than their older counterparts. Additionally, newer software boasts better features, and increased security through patches, bug fixes, and software updates.

Though it would require a bit of an initial investment, upgrading your office, particularly if you are still using any of these programs, will end up saving you in the long run in time and money made back due to increased productivity.

If your business is still using these outdated software products, give us a call today. We can help you evaluate which newer versions are right for your business, and help get them implemented and installed so that you aren’t affected by this change.


Julie Strier is a freelance writer who likes to help you navigate through changes in your software. Email: julie@mybusinesswriter.com. Website: www.mybusinesswriter.com.

How to Quickly Unsubscribe from Emails

Email

Image Credit: Sean MacEntee

If you’ve had your email address for any length of time, you’ve probably used it to sign up for all sorts of services – newsletters, coupons, store savings cards, and more. And while it’s helpful to receive information like this in our email, it creates its own sets of problems – like a cluttered inbox.

As time goes one, there will eventually come a time where you’ll want to unsubscribe from everything, or simply create a new email address to avoid dealing with all this extra email.

However, the problem with manually unsubscribing is that it is time consuming, often requiring multiple clicks and accessing different webpages, to take yourself off a mailing list. And creating a new email address isn’t much better, because of the time it takes to educate your important contacts on the change.

So what do you do when you need to mass unsubscribe from emails? Depending on your email address, you have a few options.

Use a Service

Unwanted email from mailing lists is now such a large problem that services are being created to help you easily and quickly manage everything. Generally, all you have to do is sign up with a service, follow a few prompts, and they’ll manage the rest.

Currently these types of services are only available for web-based email accounts such as Gmail, Yahoo! Mail, AOL, etc. Check the particulars of each service to determine which service interfaces with which email.

Services that handle unsubscribing include:

Swizzle

Unlistr – for iPhone / iPad only

UnsubscribeDeals

Unroll.me

Use Your Email Program’s Filtering Options

Many email programs will allow you to filter your inbox just by searching. To quickly and easily sort your mass mailings and newsletters, try searching for the term “unsubscribe” to pull up a list of all emails with an unsubscribe link.

Of course, you will still have to manually unsubscribe from each mailing list, still making the task a little time consuming.

These are just a few ways you can easily unsubscribe from mass emails. Do you have a favorite way to easily unsubscribe from services? Leave us a comment to let us know your tricks.


Julie Strier is a freelance writer who wants to help make your email easier to find. Email: julie@mybusinesswriter.com. Website: www.mybusinesswriter.com.